Use code SUMMER2021 to avail 20% off on your next consultation • Offer valid from 1st June to 31st August

“Is it worth treating my rosacea?”

August 10, 2019 / Duncan Fisher
Recent quality-of-life research says absolutely yes.

Rosacea is a fairly common long-term, intermittent, blushing in the face, often with inflammation and pimpling. It frequently stings. About half of all patients suffer eye irritation as well. Very occasionally, mostly in men, fibrous tissue develops on the nose.

But rosacea doesn’t kill anyone, and it’s not contagious. So should you bother treating it?

The National Rosacea Society says yes.

This month they released the figures of a large quality-of-life survey of American patients treated for various forms of the disease.

The conclusion? Successful treatment has a very clear and very positive impact on patients’ lives.

76 percent of their respondents reported that their symptoms improved after treatment. Among these people, 40 percent said that their psychological well-being had also improved, 35 percent said their social well-being had improved, and 31 percent reported improvement in their well-being at the workplace.

These patients had the complete range of symptoms. 95 percent had facial redness, 74 percent reported deep flushing, 80 percent had bumps and pimples, 59 percent said they burned or stung, and 54 percent complained of irritated eyes.

Improved well-being matched the degree to which symptoms improved. Eighty-one percent of people who had achieved clear skin said they were happier overall, seventy-one percent felt better socially, and 62 percent were having better days at their jobs. For moderate improvement, only 24 percent felt better overall, 21 percent socialised better, and 19 percent said they were better off at work.

It’s worth doing something about your rosacea, in other words. You’ll almost certainly feel better when symptoms improve.

With medical attention they usually do improve, too. Your doctor can offer topical treatments and oral medication. You yourself can help by staying out of the sun, being gentle when you wash your face (avoiding soap when you can), and using a moisturiser, preferably the unperfumed variety.

There is absolutely no reason to let your rosacea go untreated. And in fact, for your overall quality of life, there’s every reason you should do something about it.

Questions about your skin? Ask our dermatologists online for $35.